Thursday, December 18, 2008

Merry Christmas To All


Christmas is a time for love and fun,
A time to reshape souls and roots and skies,
A time to give your heart to everyone
Freely, like a rich and lavish sun,
Like a burning star to those whose lonely sighs
Show need of such a time for love and fun.

For children first, whose pain is never done,
Whose bright white fire of anguish never dies,
It's time to give your heart to every one,

That not one angel fall, to hatred won
For lack of ears to listen to her cries,
Or arms to carry him towards love and fun,

Or friends to care what happens on the run
To adult life, where joy or sadness lies.
It's time to give your heart to everyone,

For God loves all, and turns His back on none,
Good or twisted, ignorant or wise.
Christmas is a time for love and fun,
A time to give your heart to everyone
Merry Chrixst

Sunday, December 7, 2008

What I Dream of for Christmas here in Arizona !!


The greatest hot dog stand in the world serves neither hamburgers, nor polish sausage, nor grilled chicken sandwiches. There is no grill, no char-broiler, no spinning mound of gyros. At the greatest hot dog stand they only need buckets of simmering water for dogs, steamers for steaming buns and Supreme tamales and ever bubbling vats of oil for the fresh cut fries.

You can see the greatest hot dog from far up the street. Beecause the greatest hot dog stand is all glass and harsh flouresant lights and stands as a beacon for all who are hungry. If you see a line, you know it will move fast.

The greatest hot dog stand follows few of the rules laid out by the experts. Their buns are poppy-seedless. They offer few condiments beyond mustard (no ketchup on site). They do not dust their dog with celary salt. Yes, it is a Vienna sausage, but a skinnyish one at that. You really need to eat more than one at the greatest hot dog stand in the world, and many of the customers do (Sample customer, "I'll take seven hot dogs and an [extra] order of fries).

The cooks at the greatest hot dog stand in the world occupy their time in between orders by thrusting fresh idaho potatos through a machine that converts them into perfect sized french fries. These amazing sticks of pure pototo get tossed on top of each offering so that if you want to eat them inside your hot dog bun, well you can and maybe should.

The greatest hot dog stand in the world is a throwback to a world when people ate hot dogs. A throwback to a time when a great stand could keep their buns steamed just right, and their red hots, hot but not limp. So a Gene and Jude hot dog snaps right back at you. Interactive eating. With a side of hot fries, you will know you are at the greatest hot dog stand in the world.

Gene and Judes
2720 River Road
River Grove, IL 60171-1325
708-452-7634

On the corner of River Road and Grand

Sunday, November 23, 2008

Chicago Hot Dogs In Phoenix Arizona? YEP


Well the answer is a big Yes.... Don Guido's in Phoenix Arizona

Today I had the opportunity to have a Chicago Hot dog from this new place here in town, First was the great people who work here, Feel like your at home in Chi-Town.
Then they served us these works of art,or what you would think a masterpiece would look like when you long for that taste of a real Chicago dog, It was truly a diamond in the rough with everything from the glow in the dark relish, as only found in Chicago, All the way to the fresh pickle spear and that dash of celery salt to make this one mouthwatering bite of pleasure. They also carry some of Chicago's other favorites from Polish,Fire dogs and of course Chicago style Beef Sandwiches. And they also carry uncooked family packs for those wanting to bring this wonderful dog home or to what ever event you might like to share such a wonder.

LOCATION
Don Guido's Chicago Style Hot Dogs
8911 North Central Ave
Phoenix.Arizona
602-944-1923

HOURS

Mon-Fri..10:30am-5:30pm
Saturday..11:00am-3:00pm
Closed Sunday

Wednesday, November 5, 2008

Tasty Dog


TASTY DOG
701 Lake Street
Oak Park, Illinois 60302
Phone: (708) 383-2645

Rated One of Top Ten
Hot Dogs in America!


Re-connect with suburban youth at this Oak Park mainstay, where everything on the menu costs less than a fiver. Hot dogs, cheeseburgers and gyros are among the offerings here, served up in a hurry by the efficient staff behind the counter. The large, clean dining room even includes counter seating for solo dining and six outdoor tables for those who want to commune with nature (or traffic). With so many more sophisticated dining options in Oak Park, Tasty Dog's clientele skews more towards cash-strapped high school students, but the place is so popular that the city's threat to close it in 2001 sparked emotional demonstrations and a petition. Relocated across the street to make way for new development, Tasty Dog's new digs are bright and spacious. If you still feel the need for a little culture with your meal, take a look at the old photos on the walls for a quick lesson in Oak Park history.

Thursday, October 23, 2008

John McCain For President












Why John McCain Other than he LOVES Chicago Hot dogs.........Heres Why..

Early on in his life as a midshipman at the Naval Academy, the most important lesson John McCain learned was that to sustain his self-respect for a lifetime it would be necessary for him to have the honor of serving something greater than his self-interest -- service to his country. John McCain has always put his country's interests before any party, special interest and even his own self-interest. He has always and will always do what is right for our country.



John McCain has a strong record of working across the aisle to reform how business is done in Washington. Throughout his career of public service, John McCain has worked across party aisles with Republicans and Democrats alike to reform our campaign finance system, confirm qualified judges like Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Sam Alito, and enhance our homeland security. He spoke out against his own party's out-of-control spending, against the Administration to change a failing strategy in Iraq, and against an energy bill that was full of giveaways to Big Oil companies.

To keep our nation prosperous, strong and growing we have to rethink, reform and reinvent: the way we educate our children; train our workers; deliver health care services; support retirees; fuel our transportation network; stimulate research and development; and harness new technologies.

Under a McCain presidency the United States will experience robust economic growth, and Americans will again have confidence in their economic future. A reduction in the corporate tax rate from the second highest in the world to one on par with our trading partners; the low rate on capital gains; allowing business to deduct in a single year investments in equipment and technology, while eliminating tax loopholes and ending corporate welfare, will spur innovation and productivity, and encourage companies to keep their operations and jobs in the United States. Doubling the size of the child exemption will put more disposable income in the hands of taxpayers, further stimulating growth.

Under a McCain presidency the United States will be well on the way to independence from foreign sources of oil; progress that will not only begin to alleviate the environmental threat posed from climate change, but will greatly improve our security as well. John McCain has proposed a comprehensive energy plan - the Lexington Project - that will lower the price of gas while utilizing every energy source to move us toward energy independence. He believes we need to develop advanced alternative energy sources while developing existing energy sources by drilling offshore, expanding nuclear power and encouraging clean coal technologies.

Under a McCain presidency health care will become more accessible to more Americans than at any other time in history. Reforms of the insurance market; putting the choice of health care into the hands of American families rather than exclusively with the government or employers; walk in clinics as alternatives to emergency room care; paying for outcome in the treatment of disease rather than individual procedures; and competition in the prescription drug market will wring out the runaway inflation once endemic in our health care system.

Finally to secure the peace for future generations, John McCain will end the war in Iraq with victory and bring our troops home with honor. John McCain hates war. And he knows very personally how terrible its costs are. But he knows, too, that the course of immediate withdrawal in Iraq could draw us into a wider war with even greater sacrifices; put peace further out of reach, and Americans back in harm's way. John McCain will also win the war in Afghanistan by increasing the size of forces there and adopting a true counterinsurgency strategy, much like the one that has been successful in Iraq that John McCain advocated. He will continue to hunt down al Qaeda and Osama bin Laden.

John McCain has the strength to keep America safe and the courage to secure the peace.

There are many public causes where service can make our country a stronger, better one than we inherited. Wherever there is a hungry child, a great cause exists to serve. Where there is an illiterate adult, a great cause exists to serve. Wherever there are people who are denied the basic rights of Man, a great cause exists to serve. Wherever there is suffering, a great cause exists to serve. John McCain has spent his life serving our country and will continue to work with anyone who sincerely wants to get this country moving again. He will listen to any idea that is offered in good faith and intended to help solve our problems, not make them worse. He will seek the counsel of members of Congress from both parties in forming government policy before asking them to support it.

From the day he is sworn into office until the last hour of his presidency, John McCain will work with anyone, of either party, to make this country safe, prosperous and proud.

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Saturday, October 11, 2008

Superdawg on Milwaukee Ave



In May of 1948, Superdawg® was established at the corner of Milwaukee, Devon and Nagle in Chicago. Superdawg® continues to be family owned and operated in the same location today.

Maurie Berman, a recently returned G.I. from World War II, married his high school sweetheart Florence (Flaurie), in August of 1947. Maurie was attending Northwestern University, studying to be a CPA, while recent Northwestern grad Flaurie was teaching in the Chicago Public Schools. With their "school-year" schedules, the newlyweds wanted to open a business that they could operate during the summer months. Many other returning G.I.'s were opening roadside hot dog carts and Maurie and Flaurie decided to open their own roadside hot dog stand, one that would be as unique and distinctive as they were.

Maurie designed an architecturally distinct, 20' x 12' building topped with two 12 foot hot dog icons to beckon hungry passersby with their winking and blinking eyes. Maurie and Flaurie then created a proprietary, secret recipe to set themselves apart from the other hot dog stands popping up around the city. With a distinctive look and delicious recipe, they were almost ready to open. All they needed was a name. Inspired by the superheroes featured in the newly-created, popular comics of the '40's, Maurie and Flaurie named their signature product and restaurant. It was not a wiener – not a frankfurter – not a red hot – but their own exclusive SUPERDAWG™.

In 1948, Milwaukee and Devon was the end of the streetcar line. With the forest preserve and Whealan Pool across the street, the area was a great destination for swimming families and cruisin' teens. Kids could ride the streetcar for a nickel, and stop at Superdawg® where a Superdawg™ sandwich and drink cost only 32 cents. Many times, on their way home, they would stop and ask what they could buy for a dime. If they were a few cents short, Maurie and Flaurie would give them what they wanted and told them to bring the money back the next time they stopped, which they never failed to do.

In 1950 Maurie passed the CPA exam, but he and Flaurie decided to keep operating Superdawg® and to open year-round in order to retain the outstanding personnel that had become so invaluable to fulfilling the Superdawg® ideals. When Superdawg® first opened, the electronic speaker system had not been invented. Carhops went out to the cars to take orders and customers signaled that they were ready for their trays to be picked up by turning on their headlights. In the early 1950's the "carhop in a wire" electronic speaker system was installed, and Maurie designed the glowing blue "control tower" where the carhop sits to answer the switchboard and take orders. As Superdawg® grew into a successful business, Maurie and Flaurie found time to raise their family of three children (although not on Whoopercheesies® alone).

Throughout the years, small changes have been made to the menu, like the addition of the Whoopskidawg® in 1989 and the Superchic™ in 1991. However, the Superdawg™ recipe, the original trademark figures (continuing to flirtatiously wink at each other), and the drive-in concept have not changed. Customers can still order from their car and have a carhop deliver their order on a tray. Maurie and Flaurie’s attention to quality products and service, preparing each customer's meal to order, affirming the belief that the customer is always right, and insisting that the customer should always be treated as family continues today.

In 1999, Superdawg® underwent a makeover while retaining the original building and spirit. The classic '40's drive-in was updated with the addition of neon-studded canopies across the parking lot, a crisp new speaker system and a cozy, indoor dining room. The original rooftop figures were refurbished so that they can continue to serve as a Chicago landmark for years to come. In 2003, Superdawg® opened a second location on Midway Airport's B concourse, servicing Southwest Airlines.

Since 1948, Maurie, Flaurie, their children and grandchildren have scrupulously adhered to one goal: "always to serve you in a manner that will make you want to return – and bring your friends, and new generations, with you".

From the bottom of our pure beef hearts... THANKS FOR STOPPING

Sunday, October 5, 2008

SUPREME TAMALES


When eating a Chicago Hot Dog you must add a Supreme Tamale to make it a true Chi- Town Meal

Since 1950, Supreme Frozen Products, Inc. has continuously supplied thousands of valued customers with only the finest quality ethnic foods available. When my Father started this company he made a promise to make his products from the same Family Recipe he learned years ago; a recipe of Family Pride, Fresh Ingredients, and Quality Services.

Years later that very same recipe is used in Supreme Frozen Products line of quality foods - the authentic ethnic flavors thousands of people have come to enjoy. Today, that success story has inspired an expanded line of exciting new products. Now in addition to our famous Supreme Tamale Beef Tamales, there are Beef and Bean Burritos, Beef Chili with Beans, and Crispy Pizza Fluffs (all USDA inspected and passed). Delicious new flavors made with that same family recipe my Father perfected years ago.
It would be our pleasure to have the opportunity to serve you!

CHILI
This robust combination of homemade flavors and spices is a real chili lover's delight. Made with only the finest ingredients. Ground beef, red kidney beans, thick tomato paste, chili peppers and spices are blended together to create a rich hearty meal. Packed in retail and food service containers.
PIZZA FLUFFS
Supreme takes "The Heart of the Pizza" and brings to you the Pizza Fluff. A unique and different twist to Italy's traditional pizza. We've combined cooked Italian sausage, juicy ripe tomatoes, aged mozzarella cheese, Italian seasonings, and wrapped them in our delicate fluffy bread dough. A delicious, flavorful creation that's sure to satisfy. Packed in retail and food service sizes.

TAMALES
Our Supreme Tamale is made from a tasty blend of enriched cornmeal. ground beef, garlic, and seven secret spices all rolled up into one. Steamed or boiled, this spicy combination is a perfect complement to any meal. Packed by state of the art machinery and available to you in retail and food service sizes. 24-count decorative display trays are also available.
BURRITOS
A soft hand rolled flour tortilla stuffed with cooked ground beef, pinto beans, chili pepper, onions and spices. Just the right balance of ground beef and seasonings. Tex-Mex at its best. packed in convenient retail and food services cases. 24-count attractive display trays are available upon request.


For more information about our products

Supreme Frozen Products Inc.
5813 W. Grand Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60639
(773) 622-3777 or (888) 643-0405

Thursday, September 25, 2008

A SAD DAY IN A HOT DOG LOVERS LIFE


No words needed,The picture says it all




Tissue Anyone??

Sunday, September 7, 2008

Fat Johnnies on Western


Fat Johnnie's Famous Red Hots
7242 S Western Ave
Chicago, IL 60636
Phone: (773) 737-6294



Review for Fat Johnnie's Famous Red Hots
In Short
This dilapidated shack on busy Western Avenue has been serving up Great hot dogs, sausage and tamales for more than 30 years. Place your order through the window, then eat in the car or at one of several picnic tables set up in the summer. Hot dogs are steamed and topped with mustard, neon-green relish, chopped onions, cucumber and tomato. Those with a bigger appetite might go for a double dog (two wieners, one bun) or a fat one (a larger dog).


Insider Tips
Know Before You Go
Fat Johnnie's takes pride in staying open all year despite the winter cold. It does close early, though, due to the sketchy nature of the neighborhood.

Where to Sit
If the picnic tables outside are full, there are more tables available two houses to the north.

Monday, September 1, 2008

Poochies in Skokie, (Joeltown)




Poochie's

3832 Dempster St
(between Avers Ave & Hamlin Ave)
Skokie, IL 60076
(847) 673-0100

Located in the Poochie's Plaza, this dog stand wins fans of all ages. While a regular boiled Vienna Beef frank is available, the char dog stars, grilled and blackened, with a smoky flavor. A dog with everything includes relish, mustard, pickle, tomato, onions and celery salt; the staff actually refuses to put ketchup on a dog (it's un-Chicago). Fresh-cut skin-on french fries are the perfect accompaniment.

Saturday, August 23, 2008

Chicago Maxwell Street Polish ??


A Maxwell Street Polish consists of a grilled all-beef Polish sausage topped with grilled onions and mustard on a bun. The sandwich was first created by Jimmy Stefanovic, a Macedonian immigrant, who took over his aunt and uncle's hot-dog stand (now Jim's Original) in Chicago's Maxwell Street marketplace in 1939.[1] It is sometime referred to as a "Jewtown Dog," or "Jew Dog"[citation needed]. (Part of the market was called Jewtown after the original Jewish merchants.)

The Maxwell Street Polish soon grew to be one of Chicago's most popular local dishes, along with the Chicago hot-dog. It is served by restaurants around the city, and is common at sporting events. Many small vendors specialize in the Maxwell Street Polish along with the pork-chop sandwich.

Some variations exist. For example, some hot-dog vendors offer a "Maxwell Street hot dog" in which a hot dog is substituted for the Polish sausage. Others like to add sport peppers to the Maxwell Street to give it more heat.

Due to UIC's South Campus development (ongoing construction, started in 2002), the two famous Maxwell Street Polish stands on the corner of Halsted and Maxwell streets, Jim's Original and Maxwell St. Express Grill, were displaced to nearby Union Avenue, adjacent to the Dan Ryan Expressway on-ramp at Roosevelt Road.

Sunday, August 17, 2008

Johnnies Beef and Sausage, Elmwood Park , Il


A Beef Sandwich to Die For........
Johnnie's Beef
7500 W. North Ave., Elmwood Park

Hours: Mon-Sat 11am-12am, Sun 12pm-12am

Tel: (708) 452-6000

Chicago is one of the few cities in the country where there are many places to eat great Italian beef and Johnnie's Beef ranks among the best of them. The small beef stand is a perfectly preserved piece of the traditionally Italian neighborhood that surrounds it.

The structure itself resembles an old drive-in eatery, with baby blue walls and yellow neon signs. It is only big enough to hold about ten standing customers at its bar, and seems to have a line that stretches down the block at any time of day. The employees work together as a well oiled machine, though, which minimizes the wait. One worker assembles hot dogs, one spears sausages from the grill, one slaps together the beefs and yet another fills cups with Italian ices (make sure you say you don't want a lid on your ice...that way you get a nice heaping cup of it). Be sure to have your order straight by the time you get to the head of the line; the man who rings you up gets quite upset at indecision or stuttering.


The menu is small, but everything is exceptional. The Italian beef and sausage sandwiches are notably famous, as well as the Italian ices and hot dogs. Every Friday Johnnie's serves up amazing fried egg sandwiches.

Many Chicagoans consider Johnnie's to be the best Italian Beef joint in the world, which accounts for the long line you will usually encounter on your visit. And I will be their this weekend to enjoy one on my visit to Chicago, My home town !!!

Sunday, August 10, 2008

Murphy's Red Hots/Chicago Style



Murphy's takes their hot dogs on a "walk thru the garden", adding tomatoes and cucumbers on top of the usual "everything" fixin's, which is why some dub their dogs a "Chicago salad". Try the gut busting char-broiled foot long for a real treat. Hand cut fries make for a nice side.
Address: 1211 W. Belmont
Neighborhood: Lakeview
Phone: 773-935-2882
Hours: Monday 11 a.m. - 4 p.m., Tuesday - Friday 11 a.m. - 8:30 p.m., Saturday 11 a.m. - 8 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Cons
Lines can be long, especially on weekends
Very small dine-in area
Cash only
Description
Address: 1211 W. Belmont
Phone: 773-935-2882
Neighborhood: Lakeview
Getting There by Train: Brown/Red Line North to Belmont
Cross Streets: Belmont and Racine
Nearest Major Attraction: Wrigley Field
Hours: Mon 11am-4pm, Tue-Fri 11am-8:30pm, Sat 11am-8pm, Sun 11am-5pm
Price: ¢
Guide Review - Murphy's Red Hots
A lot of fuss has been made about Chicago pizza, but any true Chicagoan knows that the native food is the hot dog (or the "red hot", as Murphy's insists on calling it). Known by some as a "Chicago salad", the all-beef Vienna hot dogs ($2.79) at Murphy's are best with everything on it -- also called a "walk thru the garden" -- mustard, relish, onion, pickle, lettuce, tomato, cucumber, celery salt and sport peppers. The sweetness of the hot dog combined with the freshness and crunch of the condiments is a regional treat. Try the char-broiled foot long ($4.55) for the ultimate Chicago hot dog experience.

If you are not a fan of hot dogs, there are several other excellent choices. The ribeye steak sandwich ($5.25) with Swiss cheese, horseradish mustard and sliced onions is tender, the char-broiled hamburgers ($3.35) are top rate, and Mrs. Murphy's homemade chicken noodle soup and chili are perfect for a cold Chicago winter's day. The hand cut fries are golden and tasty, and the only item in Murphy's that should come in contact with ketchup. The cheese fries ($2.55) are an anomaly, as the cheese is served on the side, which I prefer

Sunday, August 3, 2008

Tasty Dog ...Oak Park ,Illinois


TASTY DOG
701 Lake Street
Oak Park, Illinois 60302
Phone: (708) 383-2645

Rated One of Top Ten
Hot Dogs in America!


Re-connect with suburban youth at this Oak Park mainstay, where everything on the menu costs less than a fiver. Hot dogs, cheeseburgers and gyros are among the offerings here, served up in a hurry by the efficient staff behind the counter. The large, clean dining room even includes counter seating for solo dining and six outdoor tables for those who want to commune with nature (or traffic). With so many more sophisticated dining options in Oak Park, Tasty Dog's clientele skews more towards cash-strapped high school students, but the place is so popular that the city's threat to close it in 2001 sparked emotional demonstrations and a petition. Relocated across the street to make way for new development, Tasty Dog's new digs are bright and spacious. If you still feel the need for a little culture with your meal, take a look at the old photos on the walls for a quick lesson in Oak Park history.

Sunday, July 27, 2008

Fun and Interesting Facts About Hot Dogs



Baseball and Hot Dogs!
Regardless of your home team, there’s one thing nearly all baseball fans have in common: a love of the All American Hot Dog. Americans will eat 24.2 million Hot Dogs in major league ballparks -- that's enough to stretch coast-to-coast from Dodgers' Stadium in Los Angeles to Camden Yards in Baltimore.

Top 10 Hot Dog Baseball Stadiums for 2005
1. Dodger Stadium – 1,674,400
2. Coors Field – 1,545,000
3. Wrigley Field – 1,543,500
4. Yankees Stadium – 1,365,000
5. Minute Maid Park – 1,248,000
6. Edison Field – 1,133,000
7. HHH Metrodome – 850,000
8. Citizens Bank Park – 800,000
9. Shea Stadium – 745,000
10. U.S. Cellular Field – 495,000

In Chicago, more than 80% of the 1,800-plus hot dog vendors proudly feature Vienna® Beef products. Vienna is often considered the Rolls-Royce of Hot Dogs.
Travelers passing through Chicago's O'Hare airport purchase 2 million Hot Dogs each year according to restaurant and concession stand reports. This makes O'hare the biggest Hot Dog seller in the United States.
Actor Bruce Willis proposed to Demi Moore at Pink's Hot Dog stand in Hollywood, California.
Americans typically consume 7 billion Hot Dogs between Memorial Day and Labor Day.
On the Fourth of July, Americans will enjoy 150 million Hot Dogs!
On every Independence Day since 1916, at its original Coney Island hot dog stand, Nathan's Famous Fourth of July Hot Dog Eating Contest has celebrated this iconic American food.
The United States Chamber of Commerce officially designated July as National Hot Dog Month in 1957, and the tradition has been going strong ever since.
July 20th has been declared National Hot Dog Day.
Every second of every day, 450 Hot Dogs are eaten in the United States.
Nearly one-third of all Americans eat Hot Dogs one to three times per month.
Sixty percent of Americans prefer their Hot Dogs grilled.
Twenty one percent prefer their Hot Dogs boiled.
The world's longest hot dog was 1,996 feet, made in honor of the 1996 Olympics.
People who cook Hot Dogs tend to be women, 25 to 44 years old, married with school-age children.
How many Hot Dogs do Americans eat each year and where do they eat them?
According to recent survey data obtained by the Council, Americans purchase 350 million pounds of hot dogs at retail stores - that's 9 billion hot dogs! But the actual number of hot dogs consumed by Americans is probably much larger. It is difficult to calculate the number of hot dogs Americans may eat at sporting events, local picnics and carnivals. The Council estimates Americans consume 20 billion hot dogs a year - more than twice the retail sales figures. That works out to about 70 hot dogs per person each year. Hot dogs are served in 95 percent of homes in the United States. Fifteen percent of hot dogs are purchased from street vendors and 9 percent are purchased at ballparks, according to statistics from the Heartland Buffalo Company. New York City was named America's leading Hot Dog sales city, followed by L.A. and the Baltimore-D.C. area.

In the Mood for a Huge Hot Dog?
Head on over to the new indoor miniature golf course at Vitense Golfland and check out the Hot Dog slide! Your kids will love it...and so will you. The Madison themed course showcases many of Madison's famous landmarks and businesses. Although the Vitense website claims that the centerpiece of the course is the Capitol building, we would have to politely disagree and choose the giant Hot Dog. The Dog is topped with ketchup and mustard. Hey, it's not a Chicago Dog, but it still looks mighty tasty!

Vitense Golfland is located on the west side of Madison at 5501 Schroeder Rd (West Beltline and Whitney Way). Website: www.vitense.com Phone: (608) 271-1411

A Chicago Dog in Toronto Canada?
In Toronto, Canada hot dogs are the only kind of street food allowed by law. The law sets extremely high (almost unachievable) requirements for street-food vendors, with an exception for "pre-cooked meat products in the form of wieners or similar products to be served on a bun". That results in a greater competition amoung vendors and excellent quality of the hotdogs in the city. (Note: One of the best Chicago Dogs I ever had was from a street vendor in Toronto). Here is a link to the Toronto Department of Public Health requirements for Hot Dog carts: http://www.city.toronto.on.ca/health/he/hd_index.htm

How to Say Hot Dog in Different Languages

Spanish - Perrito Caliente
Italian - Caldo cane
French - Chien chaud
German - Heisser Hund or Wurst
Portugese - Cachorro quente
Swedish - Korv or varmkorv
Norwegian/Danish - Grillpolser
Latin - Pastillum botello fartum
Czech - Park v rohliku
Dutch- Worstjes
Finnish - Makkarat

Regional Variations
Hot Dogs are served countless ways and vary greatly by region. Many cities are well known for their unique style of blending and configuring the ingredients on their Dogs. Hot Dogs not only differ by how they are prepared and accessorized, but also in size. Regular Hot Dogs are 6 inches in length (15 cm) and "footlong" Hot Dogs are twelve inches (30 cm) long. Here are some of the many popular ways Hot Dogs are served throughout the country:

Chicago - Vienna beef hot dog topped with chopped onions, diced/wedged tomatoes, a dill pickle spear, pickled hot peppers ("sport peppers"), pickle relish, mustard, and celery salt, and served on a poppyseed bun.

Cincinnati - Usually served as a "cheese coney" with Cincinnati chili, shredded mild cheddar cheese, and sometimes chopped onion and/or mustard.

Upstate New York - There are two distinct types of hot dogs. There are Red Hots and White Hots. Red Hots are "normal" hot dogs while White Hots are plumper and were first made by Zweigles of Rochester N.Y.

New York - The street cart-style hot dog is the Sabrett all-beef natural casing frank, boiled and served with onion sauce and deli mustard—or sauerkraut.

North Carolina - Also with chili and cole slaw, with the addition of mustard and onions. Referred to as a hot dog 'all the way.'

Pacific Northwest - Often enjoyed with some combination of ketchup, mustard, relish, and mayo.

Boston - Often served steamed as opposed to grilled. Ketchup, mustard, relish, picalilli, and chopped onions are common toppings. The "Fenway Frank" is a fixture for Red Sox fans.

West Virginia - Hot dogs are usually served with chili sauce (usually without beans) and cole slaw. When served without a wiener, it is locally called a "chili dog", much to the confusion of non-residents. Click Here for more information about West Virginia Hot Dogs.

Rhode Island - Called New York Style Hot Wieners, and served with meat sauce, chopped onion, mustard, and celery salt.

Providence Rhode Island - Home of the excellent New York System Frank, your basic hot dog covered with a watery, all-beef chili, raw chopped onions and curry powder.

Detroit - Served as a "coney" with chili sauce, mustard, and onions on a steamed bun.

Kansas City - A Dog with sauerkraut and melted cheese.

New Jersey - Several styles of Hot Dogs are popular here: A "Potato Dog" has diced and stewed potatoes, brown mustard and served on spicy Sabrett® brand Hot Dog. "Texas Weiners" (chili dogs everywhere else) are Hot Dogs served with brown mustard, hot and spicy chili and diced raw onions. An "Italian Dog" has fried onions, peppers and potatoes.

Georgia - Especially, South Georgia, has a "Scrambled" Dog (or dawg). This is a cheap, usually red-skinned hot dog, on a toasted white bun and topped with mustard and spicy chili sauce.

Southern Slaw Dog - Topped with mustard, chili and cole slaw.


Regional Hot Dog Recipes
In June 2005, The CBS Early Show had a segment called, "Not All Dogs Are Created Equal". Just in time for the 4th of July, the Early Show's resident Chef Bobby Flay shared some of his favorite regional Hot Dog recipes. Click Here to check out the featured recipes.

Attend Hot Dog U's School of Mobile Food Service
Hot Dog University is the only business school where you can learn the knowledge and trade secrets necessary to successfully launch your career in the mobile food service business. This is the place to go if you are considering running a hot dog cart. We had no idea such a place existed until we were contacted by Mark Reitman, the founder and instructor at Hot Dog U. Kevin and I hope to one day attend their class.

Hot Dog Etiquette
If you think eating Hot Dogs is all about slapping a wiener on a bun, you're in for a surprise. If you're going to dine on dogs properly, you'll need these do's and don'ts from the National Hot Dog and Sausage Council.

Don't ...

Put hot dog toppings between the hot dog and the bun. Always "dress the dog," not the bun.
Leave bits of bun on your plate. Eat it all.
Use ketchup on your hot dog after the age of 18.
Use a cloth napkin to wipe your mouth when eating a hot dog. Paper is always preferable.
Put fresh herbs on the same plate with hot dogs. Mustard, relish, onions, cheese and chili are acceptable.
Bring wine to a hot dog barbecue. Beer, soda, lemonade and iced tea are preferable.
Send a thank you note following a hot dog barbecue. It would not be in keeping with the unpretentious nature of hot dogs.
Ever think there is a wrong time to serve hot dogs.
Do ...

Apply condiments in the following order: wet condiments such as mustard and chili are applied first, followed by chunky condiments such as relish, onions and sauerkraut, followed by shredded cheese, followed by spices, like celery salt or pepper.
Serve sesame seed, poppy seed and plain buns with hot dogs. Sun-dried tomato buns or basil buns are considered gauche with franks.
Eat hot dogs on buns with your hands. Utensils should not touch hot dogs on buns.
Condiments remaining on the fingers after eating a hot dog should be licked away, not washed.
Use paper plates to serve hot dogs. Every day dishes are acceptable. China is a no-no.

Poppy Seeds and Positive Drug Tests
Can the consumption of poppy seeds used on bagels, buns and muffins produce positive results on drug screening tests? YES!


A Hot Dog Program
Our friends at PBS have created a show all about Hot Dogs appropriately titled, "A Hot Dog Program". It's an all-American celebration of those fabulous and phenomenally popular little sausages in their soft little buns. Whether you like your dog with mustard and sauerkraut, chili and cheese, or with the "works," this program is sure to please. For more information, or to buy the DVD, click here.


At the Movies
"How can I trust a man who won't eat a good old-fashioned American hot dog?". --From the movie S.W.A.T. starring Samuel L Jackson.

"Nobody, but nobody, puts ketchup on a hot dog anymore!". --From Sudden Impact.

"You look like the Fourth of July! Makes me want a hot dog real bad!" --From Legally Blonde.

"I can't forget it. I am sorry. I had no idea it was your cab. Let me make it up to you. How about a nice hot dog and a beer." --From Planes, Trains and Automobiles.

"Eat the hot dog, don't be one!". --From Steel.

"I want to buy eight hot dogs and eight hot dog buns to go with them. But no one sells eight hot dog buns. They only sell twelve hot dog buns. So I end up paying for four buns I don't need. So I am removing the superfluous buns. Yeah. And you want to know why? Because some big-shot over at the wiener company got together with some big-shot over at the bun company and decided to rip off the American public. Because they think the American public is a bunch of trusting nit-wits who will pay for everything they don't need rather than make a stink." --From Father of the Bride.

Humor
What did the Zen Buddhist say to the Hot Dog vendor? "Make me one with everything".

Why did the man put a sweater on his Hot Dog? Because it was a chili dog.

May the dragon of life only roast your hot-dogs and never burn your buns!


Hot Dog Festivals and Events
Nathan's Famous Forth of July International Hot Dog Eating Contest. Every year, this competitve eating contest draws contestants from all over the world. In 2007, six-time defending champion Takeru "Tsunami" Kobayashi was beaten by Joey Chestnut, who won by eating a record-breaking 66 hot dogs in 12 minutes. Click Here for more information on Nathan's and their annual hot dog eating competition.

Frankfort, Indiana holds their annual Hot Dog Festival the last weekend in July. Come celebrate this favorite summer food and all the great puns that go with it! http://www.accs.net/mainstreet/festival.htm

Tehachapi, California All American 4th of July Hot Dog Festival. http://www.tehachapicentral.com/hotdogfestival2.html

West Virginia Hot Dog Festival. http://www.edarnold.net/hotdog

Columbus, Ohio Great American Hot Dog Festival. http://www.hotdogfestival.com

Saturday, July 19, 2008

Portillos.One of Chicago's Finest !!


Portillo's Hot Dogs
The best food and the best service!

Welcome to Portillo's Hot Dogs, Inc., started in 1963 by Dick Portillo in a small trailer and soon will be operating in 31 locations. His dedication to serving "the best food" and "the best service" available will make it worth your visit. Requests for his "type" of food and "service" are received daily at the corporate office from many of the 50 states (including Alaska) and many foreign countries. Calls from Taiwan, the Phillipines, Singapore, China, Europe, and Korea are just a few. Customers in the Chicagoland area also call frequently requesting a store just "a little closer to our house."

So, come enjoy what we hope you will find to be the best Hot Dog, Italian Beef, Maxwell Street Polish, Tasty Burgers, Fresh Salads and more at any of our locations. Bring the kids and ENJOY!

Portillo's won so many Silver Platter awards (the "Oscars" of the food industry) that the company retired from competition for 5 years to give others a chance. Come try our award-winning food and see if you agree.

Sunday, July 13, 2008

Parkeys in Forest Park


Parky's Hot Dogs
329 Harlem Ave
Forest Park, IL 60130-1607
Phone: (708) 366-3090

Cross Street: Washington Boulevard Directions: El: Green Line to Harlem/Lake; bus: 357 to Washington
Specialties: French Fries, Hot Dog
Hours: Mon-Sat 10am-9pm, Sun 11am-7pm

In Short
This compact orange-and-white A-frame has just a couple of stools at the window for seating, plus outdoor picnic tables during warm weather. Folks don't mind waiting for David Berg hot dogs--shorter and plumper than Vienna Beef, and steamed, not grilled. The basic dog gets mustard, chopped onion, pickle relish, tomato and peppers. Also available are chili cheese dogs, Polish sausages, grilled burgers, chicken sandwiches and Italian beef; all served with long, thin fries.

Saturday, July 5, 2008

How to Make a Chicago Hot Dog



You have not eaten a hot dog until you've eaten a Chicago hot dog. In just a few steps, you can enjoy this unique gastronomical delight, share it with all your friends and join an elite level of carnivorous snobs!

Steps
Steam a poppy seed hot dog bun until soft; not soggy.
Place a cooked Beef hot dog in the bun. (steamed best -- grilled ok)
Coat hot dog with yellow mustard in a zig-zag fashion to your liking.
Add neon-green pickle relish to your liking
Add raw chopped white onion to the dog
Put two tomato wedges in between the dog and bun
Tuck 2-3 sport peppers next to tomatoes
Add a kosher dill pickle spear in between the dog and bun
Add a dash of celery salt


Tips
Use only All Beef hot dogs. There is no substitute for those seeking a genuine Chicago hot dog.
Use only yellow mustard. Use of ketchup is prohibited.
Relish should be of a neon-green hue.
Some purists argue that only tomato "wedges" rather than the slices (photographed above) should be used.
Two cucumber slices can be used instead of a pickle.
Fries, if served with your hot dog, should be seeping with grease and well salted.



Warnings

Never use ketchup on a Chicago hot dog. A purist won't even have a bottle of ketchup in the same room. (If you must use ketchup, use it on your fries.)



Things You'll Need
Steamed poppy seed hot dog bun
All Beef hot dog (steamed or charred Preferably Vienna Beef)
Yellow mustard (Preferably French's)
Chopped white onion (raw)
Neon Green Relish (Preferably Rolf's)
Sport peppers (Preferably Alpe Dell's)
Tomato wedges
Crisp kosher dill pickle spear
Celery salt

Sunday, June 29, 2008

America's Dog


Lincoln Park
2300 North Lincoln Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60614
773 281 2333 p
773 281 8810 f
LincolnPark@AmericasDog.com

Sunday – Wednesday: 10 a.m. – Midnight
Thursday – Saturday: 10 a.m. – 3 a.m.


Navy Pier
700 East Grand Avenue – #121
Chicago, Illinois 60611
312 840 4000 p
312 840 9007 f
NavyPier@AmericasDog.com

Memorial Day – Labor Day hours:
Sunday – Thursday: 10 a.m.-10 p.m.
Friday and Saturday: 10 a.m.-midnight


Post Labor Day hours: (fall/winter)
Sunday – Thursday: 10 a.m. – 8 p.m.
Friday and Saturday: 10 a.m. – 10 p.m.

Randolph
26 East Randolph Street
Chicago, Illinois 60601
312 345 0100 p
312 345 0103 f
Randolph@AmericasDog.com

Monday – Friday: 10 a.m. – 8 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday: 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.


Holiday Season
Everyday: 10 a.m. – 9 p.m.

http://www.americasdog.com

This place makes great hot dogs and Navy Pier is a lot of fun with everything from the Shakespeare Theatre to the Stained Glass Museum to the Sculpture Garden to Imax to carnival rides.

In 1993, George and Manolis, the 20 something sons of Gus Alpogianis, owner of Kappy's Restaurant and Pancake House, in Morton Grove had an idea for a new restaurant. They took a three week cross country trip from New York to LA gorging on America's favorite food at every chance along the way. At the end of their "whirlwind weiner" tour their Jeep was filled with mustard stained napkins, grease stained French fry bags, a wad of notes, and a plan.

Three years later they opened America's Dog, an homage to the hot dog theme and variations in the food court of the colorful carnie/bazaar/fine arts center that has become one of the nation's most popular tourist spots, Navy Pier. There they rub elbows with McDonald's, Ryba's Fudge, and King Wah Express, among others.

The menu has the classic Chicago Hot Dog, served perfectly and lovingly in a form fitting styrofoam shell that keeps it warm and the bun fluffy. One could wish for a more environmentally friendly box, but a box is better than wrapping in tissue paper as most places do it. At the core is a Vienna Beef frank, Rosen poppy seed bun, four sport peppers, and they know that the Chicago Hot Dog has celery salt and you shouldn't have to ask for it. I was especially impressed with the fat pickle spear that was crunchy, not too salty, and still had the taste of cucumber in it. Not surprisingly the Chicago Dog is their best seller accounting for 40% of all orders.
Navy Pier Food Court, 700 E. Grand Ave., Chicago, IL 60611. Phone 312-595-5541. Hours: From Memorial Day to Labor Day they are open 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 10 a.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday. Fall and winter hours are 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, and 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday.
http://www.americasdog.com

Yeah, yeah, I know this place is new and sterile and touristy in a food court not far from McDonald's. But they make great hot dogs and Navy Pier is a lot of fun with everything from the Shakespeare Theatre to the Stained Glass Museum to the Sculpture Garden to Imax to carnival rides.

In 1993, George and Manolis, the 20 something sons of Gus Alpogianis, owner of Kappy's Restaurant and Pancake House, in Morton Grove had an idea for a new restaurant. They took a three week cross country trip from New York to LA gorging on America's favorite food at every chance along the way. At the end of their "whirlwind weiner" tour their Jeep was filled with mustard stained napkins, grease stained French fry bags, a wad of notes, and a plan.

Three years later they opened America's Dog, an homage to the hot dog theme and variations in the food court of the colorful carnie/bazaar/fine arts center that has become one of the nation's most popular tourist spots, Navy Pier. There they rub elbows with McDonald's, Ryba's Fudge, and King Wah Express, among others.

The menu has the classic Chicago Hot Dog, served perfectly and lovingly in a form fitting styrofoam shell that keeps it warm and the bun fluffy. One could wish for a more environmentally friendly box, but a box is better than wrapping in tissue paper as most places do it. At the core is a Vienna Beef frank, Rosen poppy seed bun, four sport peppers, and they know that the Chicago Hot Dog has celery salt and you shouldn't have to ask for it. I was especially impressed with the fat pickle spear that was crunchy, not too salty, and still had the taste of cucumber in it. Not surprisingly the Chicago Dog is their best seller accounting for 40% of all orders.
Navy Pier Food Court, 700 E. Grand Ave., Chicago, IL 60611. Phone 312-595-5541. Hours: From Memorial Day to Labor Day they are open 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 10 a.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday. Fall and winter hours are 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, and 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday.
http://www.americasdog.com

Yeah, yeah, I know this place is new and sterile and touristy in a food court not far from McDonald's. But they make great hot dogs and Navy Pier is a lot of fun with everything from the Shakespeare Theatre to the Stained Glass Museum to the Sculpture Garden to Imax to carnival rides.

In 1993, George and Manolis, the 20 something sons of Gus Alpogianis, owner of Kappy's Restaurant and Pancake House, in Morton Grove had an idea for a new restaurant. They took a three week cross country trip from New York to LA gorging on America's favorite food at every chance along the way. At the end of their "whirlwind weiner" tour their Jeep was filled with mustard stained napkins, grease stained French fry bags, a wad of notes, and a plan.

Three years later they opened America's Dog, an homage to the hot dog theme and variations in the food court of the colorful carnie/bazaar/fine arts center that has become one of the nation's most popular tourist spots, Navy Pier. There they rub elbows with McDonald's, Ryba's Fudge, and King Wah Express, among others.

The menu has the classic Chicago Hot Dog, served perfectly and lovingly in a form fitting styrofoam shell that keeps it warm and the bun fluffy. One could wish for a more environmentally friendly box, but a box is better than wrapping in tissue paper as most places do it. At the core is a Vienna Beef frank, Rosen poppy seed bun, four sport peppers, and they know that the Chicago Hot Dog has celery salt and you shouldn't have to ask for it. I was especially impressed with the fat pickle spear that was crunchy, not too salty, and still had the taste of cucumber in it. Not surprisingly the Chicago Dog is their best seller accounting for 40% of all orders.

Saturday, June 21, 2008

Hot Doug's Encased Meat Emporium


3324 N. California Ave., Chicago, IL 60618. 773-279-9550.
http://www.hotdougs.com

Easily the hippest pups in town. This dinky but colorful joint says on its sign that it is the "Sausage Superstore" and even has it's own theme song for which there are rock, techno, and other mixes. Proprietor Doug Sohn serves the classic Chicago Hot Dog of course, the obligatory Polies, but then there are the rabbit, boar, pheasant, duck, and kangaroo sausages. How about a venison sausage with sweet and spicy mustard and red wine soaked dried blueberries for $5.50. All the sandwiches are served in a cardboard boat so the bun is fluffy and the contents are not squished.

You can get your Vienna Beef dog boiled or grilled, and their standard prep includes onions caramelized in butter for 90 minutes. Doug says "You can't go wrong adding butter to anything." Don't skip the very nice golden brown crispy fries, which, on Fridays and Saturdays are fried in flavorful duck fat.

The gregarious Doug is often working the counter. A pleasant erudite character who, in a former life was a cookbook editor, he is also a bit of a rebel. When the City of Chicago banned foie gras, he continued to serve it until they served him with the City's first foie gras summons.

He has outfitted his small dining room with colorful chairs, Elvis memorabilia, and loopy signs and wall hangings. Certainly one of the most fun hot dog stands in town. Unfortunately it closes at 4 p.m.

Monday, June 16, 2008

Chicago Hot Dogs In Arizona ??


Well the answer is a big Yes.... Don Guido's in Phoenix Arizona

Today I had the opportunity to have a Chicago Hot dog from this new place here in town, First was the great people who work here, Feel like your at home in Chi-Town.
Then they served us these works of art,or what you would think a masterpiece would look like when you long for that taste of a real Chicago dog, It was truly a diamond in the rough with everything from the glow in the dark relish, as only found in Chicago, All the way to the fresh pickle spear and that dash of celery salt to make this one mouthwatering bite of pleasure. They also carry some of Chicago's other favorites from Polish,Fire dogs and of course Chicago style Beef Sandwiches. And they also carry uncooked family packs for those wanting to bring this wonderful dog home or to what ever event you might like to share such a wonder.

LOCATION
Don Guido's Chicago Style Hot Dogs
8911 North Central Ave
Phoenix.Arizona
602-944-1923

HOURS

Mon-Fri..10:30am-5:30pm
Saturday..11:00am-3:00pm
Closed Sunday

Saturday, June 14, 2008

Supreme Tamales


When eating a Chicago Hot Dog you must add a Supreme Tamale to make it a true Chi- Town Meal

Since 1950, Supreme Frozen Products, Inc. has continuously supplied thousands of valued customers with only the finest quality ethnic foods available. When my Father started this company he made a promise to make his products from the same Family Recipe he learned years ago; a recipe of Family Pride, Fresh Ingredients, and Quality Services.

Years later that very same recipe is used in Supreme Frozen Products line of quality foods - the authentic ethnic flavors thousands of people have come to enjoy. Today, that success story has inspired an expanded line of exciting new products. Now in addition to our famous Supreme Tamale Beef Tamales, there are Beef and Bean Burritos, Beef Chili with Beans, and Crispy Pizza Fluffs (all USDA inspected and passed). Delicious new flavors made with that same family recipe my Father perfected years ago.
It would be our pleasure to have the opportunity to serve you!

CHILI
This robust combination of homemade flavors and spices is a real chili lover's delight. Made with only the finest ingredients. Ground beef, red kidney beans, thick tomato paste, chili peppers and spices are blended together to create a rich hearty meal. Packed in retail and food service containers.
PIZZA FLUFFS
Supreme takes "The Heart of the Pizza" and brings to you the Pizza Fluff. A unique and different twist to Italy's traditional pizza. We've combined cooked Italian sausage, juicy ripe tomatoes, aged mozzarella cheese, Italian seasonings, and wrapped them in our delicate fluffy bread dough. A delicious, flavorful creation that's sure to satisfy. Packed in retail and food service sizes.

TAMALES
Our Supreme Tamale is made from a tasty blend of enriched cornmeal. ground beef, garlic, and seven secret spices all rolled up into one. Steamed or boiled, this spicy combination is a perfect complement to any meal. Packed by state of the art machinery and available to you in retail and food service sizes. 24-count decorative display trays are also available.
BURRITOS
A soft hand rolled flour tortilla stuffed with cooked ground beef, pinto beans, chili pepper, onions and spices. Just the right balance of ground beef and seasonings. Tex-Mex at its best. packed in convenient retail and food services cases. 24-count attractive display trays are available upon request.


For more information about our products

Supreme Frozen Products Inc.
5813 W. Grand Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60639
(773) 622-3777 or (888) 643-0405

Saturday, June 7, 2008

Vienna Beef Factory Store & Deli


2501 N. Damen Ave., Chicago, IL 60647. 773-235-6652.
http://www.viennabeef.com

The Damen St. location is the lunch room/deli for the meat plant, but it is open to the public, and if you're into Chicago Hot Dogs, visiting The Source is as obligatory as a trip to Napa for wine lovers. Not surprisingly the sandwich is made by the book, although I was a bit stunned to see a crinkle-cut 4" slice of pickle rather than a spear on my bun. Even their own website says it should be made with a spear. The decor is clean, and the posters are great fun. My favorite: A photo of a Chicago Hot Dog with the caption "This Hot Dog Rated NK-17. It will not be served with Ketchup to anyone under 17." They sell the posters, condiments, and meat products to take home. They even sell a Hot Dog Lovers Kit for $69.95 with 16 hot dogs, 16 poppyseed buns, mustard, relish, sport peppers, and celery salt. You need to get your own onion, pickles, and tomatoes. It's a fun place and dining with butchers in coveralls and hairnets is kinda cool, but, with its mustard yellow walls, and fluorescent lights it has all the charm or a high school cafeteria.

Sunday, June 1, 2008

Hot Doug's


Welcome to Hot Doug's!
The Sausage Superstore and
Encased Meat Emporium
3324 North California, Chicago, IL 60618
Phone: (773) 279-9550
Fax: (773) 279-9553

What can I eat at Hot Doug's, you ask?

The Dog
Chicago-Style Hot Dog with all the trimmings: 'nuff said.
$1.75

The Elvis
Polish Sausage: Smoked and savory - just like the King.
$2.50

The Paul Kelly
Bratwurst: Soaked in Beer – sort of like Paul.
$3.50

The Frankie “Five Angels” Pentangeli
(formerly The Virgil “the Turk” Sollozzo and the Luca Brasi)
Italian Sausage: Keep your friends close, your sausage closer.
$3.00

The Keira Knightley
(formerly the Jennifer Garner and the Britney Spears)
Fire Dog: Mighty hot!
$2.50

The Salma Hayek
(formerly the Madonna, the Raquel Welch and the Ann-Margret)
Andouille Sausage: Mighty, mighty, mighty hot!
$4.00

The Game of the Week
See the special's page for this week’s game sausage.

The Marty Allen
(formerly the Don Rickles)
Thuringer: Hello der beef, pork and garlic.
$3.25

The Pete Shelley
(formerly the Steve Diggle and the Howard Devoto)
Vegetarian Dog: Meatless . . . and delicious!
$2.75

The Dave Kingman
(formerly the Shawon Dunston and the Rick Reuschel)
Chicken Sausage: Classic Italian-style or zesty Sante Fe-style
$3.50

The Sally Vega
(formerly the Ace Patrick and the “Psycho” Ronnie Raines)
Corn Dog: Deep fried to a golden splendor – it’s corntacular!
$1.50
also: Veggie Corn Dog: $2.00


(So far still Just) The Charlie and James Sohn
Mini bagel dogs and tater tots – the kids love’em.
$2.50

The (Your Name Here)
Today’s celebrity sausage: See the special's page.

Add Chili to any sausage: 50¢
Add Cheese to any sausage: 25¢

FRESH-CUT FRENCH FRIES
small ............... $1.50 large ............... $2.25

DUCK FAT FRIES ..... $3.50
(Friday & Saturday only)

CHEESE FRIES
small ............... $2.25 large ............... $3.00

FOUNTAIN SODA
small ............... $1.25 large ............... $2.00

For more information, please e-mail us at:
info@hotdougs.com

Monday, May 26, 2008

Jimmy's Red Hots On Grand Ave.


4000 W. Grand Ave
Chicago,Ill
773-384-9513


The 40-year old late night West Side hot dog stand calls itself the "home of the tube steak on a bun," serving up Vienna beef hot dogs, Polish sausages and tamales with thick French fries on the side. Ketchup is strictly forbidden.

Monday, May 19, 2008

Maxwell Street Polish


A Maxwell Street Polish consists of a grilled all-beef Polish sausage topped with grilled onions and mustard on a bun. The sandwich was first created by Jimmy Stefanovic, a Macedonian immigrant, who took over his aunt and uncle's hot-dog stand (now Jim's Original) in Chicago's Maxwell Street marketplace in 1939.[1] It is sometime referred to as a "Jewtown Dog," or "Jew Dog"[citation needed]. (Part of the market was called Jewtown after the original Jewish merchants.)

The Maxwell Street Polish soon grew to be one of Chicago's most popular local dishes, along with the Chicago hot-dog. It is served by restaurants around the city, and is common at sporting events. Many small vendors specialize in the Maxwell Street Polish along with the pork-chop sandwich.

Some variations exist. For example, some hot-dog vendors offer a "Maxwell Street hot dog" in which a hot dog is substituted for the Polish sausage. Others like to add sport peppers to the Maxwell Street to give it more heat.

Due to UIC's South Campus development (ongoing construction, started in 2002), the two famous Maxwell Street Polish stands on the corner of Halsted and Maxwell streets, Jim's Original and Maxwell St. Express Grill, were displaced to nearby Union Avenue, adjacent to the Dan Ryan Expressway on-ramp at Roosevelt Road.

Monday, May 12, 2008

Facts About Hot Dogs And Americans


Baseball and Hot Dogs!
Regardless of your home team, there’s one thing nearly all baseball fans have in common: a love of the All American Hot Dog. Americans will eat 24.2 million Hot Dogs in major league ballparks -- that's enough to stretch coast-to-coast from Dodgers' Stadium in Los Angeles to Camden Yards in Baltimore.

Top 10 Hot Dog Baseball Stadiums for 2005
1. Dodger Stadium – 1,674,400
2. Coors Field – 1,545,000
3. Wrigley Field – 1,543,500
4. Yankees Stadium – 1,365,000
5. Minute Maid Park – 1,248,000
6. Edison Field – 1,133,000
7. HHH Metrodome – 850,000
8. Citizens Bank Park – 800,000
9. Shea Stadium – 745,000
10. U.S. Cellular Field – 495,000

In Chicago, more than 80% of the 1,800-plus hot dog vendors proudly feature Vienna® Beef products. Vienna is often considered the Rolls-Royce of Hot Dogs.
Travelers passing through Chicago's O'Hare airport purchase 2 million Hot Dogs each year according to restaurant and concession stand reports. This makes O'hare the biggest Hot Dog seller in the United States.
Actor Bruce Willis proposed to Demi Moore at Pink's Hot Dog stand in Hollywood, California.
Americans typically consume 7 billion Hot Dogs between Memorial Day and Labor Day.
On the Fourth of July, Americans will enjoy 150 million Hot Dogs!
On every Independence Day since 1916, at its original Coney Island hot dog stand, Nathan's Famous Fourth of July Hot Dog Eating Contest has celebrated this iconic American food.
The United States Chamber of Commerce officially designated July as National Hot Dog Month in 1957, and the tradition has been going strong ever since.
July 20th has been declared National Hot Dog Day.
Every second of every day, 450 Hot Dogs are eaten in the United States.
Nearly one-third of all Americans eat Hot Dogs one to three times per month.
Sixty percent of Americans prefer their Hot Dogs grilled.
Twenty one percent prefer their Hot Dogs boiled.
The world's longest hot dog was 1,996 feet, made in honor of the 1996 Olympics.
People who cook Hot Dogs tend to be women, 25 to 44 years old, married with school-age children.
How many Hot Dogs do Americans eat each year and where do they eat them?
According to recent survey data obtained by the Council, Americans purchase 350 million pounds of hot dogs at retail stores - that's 9 billion hot dogs! But the actual number of hot dogs consumed by Americans is probably much larger. It is difficult to calculate the number of hot dogs Americans may eat at sporting events, local picnics and carnivals. The Council estimates Americans consume 20 billion hot dogs a year - more than twice the retail sales figures. That works out to about 70 hot dogs per person each year. Hot dogs are served in 95 percent of homes in the United States. Fifteen percent of hot dogs are purchased from street vendors and 9 percent are purchased at ballparks, according to statistics from the Heartland Buffalo Company. New York City was named America's leading Hot Dog sales city, followed by L.A. and the Baltimore-D.C. area.

In the Mood for a Huge Hot Dog?
Head on over to the new indoor miniature golf course at Vitense Golfland and check out the Hot Dog slide! Your kids will love it...and so will you. The Madison themed course showcases many of Madison's famous landmarks and businesses. Although the Vitense website claims that the centerpiece of the course is the Capitol building, we would have to politely disagree and choose the giant Hot Dog. The Dog is topped with ketchup and mustard. Hey, it's not a Chicago Dog, but it still looks mighty tasty!

Vitense Golfland is located on the west side of Madison at 5501 Schroeder Rd (West Beltline and Whitney Way). Website: www.vitense.com Phone: (608) 271-1411

A Chicago Dog in Toronto Canada?
In Toronto, Canada hot dogs are the only kind of street food allowed by law. The law sets extremely high (almost unachievable) requirements for street-food vendors, with an exception for "pre-cooked meat products in the form of wieners or similar products to be served on a bun". That results in a greater competition amoung vendors and excellent quality of the hotdogs in the city. (Note: One of the best Chicago Dogs I ever had was from a street vendor in Toronto). Here is a link to the Toronto Department of Public Health requirements for Hot Dog carts: http://www.city.toronto.on.ca/health/he/hd_index.htm

How to Say Hot Dog in Different Languages

Spanish - Perrito Caliente
Italian - Caldo cane
French - Chien chaud
German - Heisser Hund or Wurst
Portugese - Cachorro quente
Swedish - Korv or varmkorv
Norwegian/Danish - Grillpolser
Latin - Pastillum botello fartum
Czech - Park v rohliku
Dutch- Worstjes
Finnish - Makkarat

Regional Variations
Hot Dogs are served countless ways and vary greatly by region. Many cities are well known for their unique style of blending and configuring the ingredients on their Dogs. Hot Dogs not only differ by how they are prepared and accessorized, but also in size. Regular Hot Dogs are 6 inches in length (15 cm) and "footlong" Hot Dogs are twelve inches (30 cm) long. Here are some of the many popular ways Hot Dogs are served throughout the country:

Chicago - Vienna beef hot dog topped with chopped onions, diced/wedged tomatoes, a dill pickle spear, pickled hot peppers ("sport peppers"), pickle relish, mustard, and celery salt, and served on a poppyseed bun.

Cincinnati - Usually served as a "cheese coney" with Cincinnati chili, shredded mild cheddar cheese, and sometimes chopped onion and/or mustard.

Upstate New York - There are two distinct types of hot dogs. There are Red Hots and White Hots. Red Hots are "normal" hot dogs while White Hots are plumper and were first made by Zweigles of Rochester N.Y.

New York - The street cart-style hot dog is the Sabrett all-beef natural casing frank, boiled and served with onion sauce and deli mustard—or sauerkraut.

North Carolina - Also with chili and cole slaw, with the addition of mustard and onions. Referred to as a hot dog 'all the way.'

Pacific Northwest - Often enjoyed with some combination of ketchup, mustard, relish, and mayo.

Boston - Often served steamed as opposed to grilled. Ketchup, mustard, relish, picalilli, and chopped onions are common toppings. The "Fenway Frank" is a fixture for Red Sox fans.

West Virginia - Hot dogs are usually served with chili sauce (usually without beans) and cole slaw. When served without a wiener, it is locally called a "chili dog", much to the confusion of non-residents. Click Here for more information about West Virginia Hot Dogs.

Rhode Island - Called New York Style Hot Wieners, and served with meat sauce, chopped onion, mustard, and celery salt.

Providence Rhode Island - Home of the excellent New York System Frank, your basic hot dog covered with a watery, all-beef chili, raw chopped onions and curry powder.

Detroit - Served as a "coney" with chili sauce, mustard, and onions on a steamed bun.

Kansas City - A Dog with sauerkraut and melted cheese.

New Jersey - Several styles of Hot Dogs are popular here: A "Potato Dog" has diced and stewed potatoes, brown mustard and served on spicy Sabrett® brand Hot Dog. "Texas Weiners" (chili dogs everywhere else) are Hot Dogs served with brown mustard, hot and spicy chili and diced raw onions. An "Italian Dog" has fried onions, peppers and potatoes.

Georgia - Especially, South Georgia, has a "Scrambled" Dog (or dawg). This is a cheap, usually red-skinned hot dog, on a toasted white bun and topped with mustard and spicy chili sauce.

Southern Slaw Dog - Topped with mustard, chili and cole slaw.

Monday, May 5, 2008

Cubs Game and a Hot Dog




Wrigley Field
1060 W. Addison St.
Chicago, IL 60613
(773) 404-2827



Hours: open on game days

What's a Chicago-style hot dog without a little Chicago baseball? Cubs and White Sox fans will argue until the end of time over who's team is better and who has the better ball park, but game attendees can feast on a Chicago favorite while eyeing the ivy landscape of Wrigley Field and enjoying the setting of a Cubs game, a perfect date with summer in Chicago.

Monday, April 28, 2008

Johnnies Beef, Elmwood Park, Illinois


A Beef Sandwich to Die For........
Johnnie's Beef
7500 W. North Ave., Elmwood Park

Hours: Mon-Sat 11am-12am, Sun 12pm-12am

Tel: (708) 452-6000

Chicago is one of the few cities in the country where there are many places to eat great Italian beef and Johnnie's Beef ranks among the best of them. The small beef stand is a perfectly preserved piece of the traditionally Italian neighborhood that surrounds it.

The structure itself resembles an old drive-in eatery, with baby blue walls and yellow neon signs. It is only big enough to hold about ten standing customers at its bar, and seems to have a line that stretches down the block at any time of day. The employees work together as a well oiled machine, though, which minimizes the wait. One worker assembles hot dogs, one spears sausages from the grill, one slaps together the beefs and yet another fills cups with Italian ices (make sure you say you don't want a lid on your ice...that way you get a nice heaping cup of it). Be sure to have your order straight by the time you get to the head of the line; the man who rings you up gets quite upset at indecision or stuttering.


The menu is small, but everything is exceptional. The Italian beef and sausage sandwiches are notably famous, as well as the Italian ices and hot dogs. Every Friday Johnnie's serves up amazing fried egg sandwiches.

Many Chicagoans consider Johnnie's to be the best Italian Beef joint in the world, which accounts for the long line you will usually encounter on your visit. And I will be their this weekend to enjoy one on my visit to Chicago, My home town !!!

Tuesday, April 22, 2008

Making a Chicago Hot Dog


Make Your Own Chicago Style Hot Dog

It's easy and fun to make your own Chicago Dog. Our guide will tell you everything you need to know to create the perfect Chicago Dog in the privacy of your own home. We will tell you where to shop, what to buy and how to properly assemble your Dog in true Chicago style. You can even print a shopping list and a step-by-step guide to adding toppings. Let's get started.

Shopping for Ingredients
In order to create your "masterpiece", it is important to start with the proper ingredients. Although you can substitute any of the ingredients mentioned here, we suggest that for your first attempt, you try the ingredients we recommend. We have carefully selected each topping to work harmoniously together to create Hot Dog Synergy. Do you remember learning about synergy in grade school? If you can't remember, synergy is two or more entities working together to produce an effect that is greater than the sum of the parts.

The Hot Dog
A Chicago Style Hot Dog is a traditionally all beef and contains no fillers. Don't even think of using a Hot Dog made from turkey, chicken or pork. Some all beef Hot Dogs are "Kosher". If you prefer a Kosher Dog, look for the Kosher symbol (K) or (U) on the packaging. When buying your Hot Dogs, stay away from the 97% fat free choices as they are more difficult to cook and lack flavor. We recommend either "Best's Kosher" or "Vienna Beef". Both of these brands are excellent and are available at most grocery stores. For a real treat, try the "jumbo" sized Dogs.
Relish
Classic Chicago Dogs are famous for their sweet bright green relish. Finding the perfect relish has been a struggle, but luckily we found Rolf's "Deli Style" Sweet Pickle Relish and Sweet Super Green Pickle Relish from the Puckered Pickle Company. Rolf's is available at Jewel stores in the Chicago area and at Woodman's in Madison. Any sweet relish will work well on your Chicago Dog, but Rolf's and the Puckered Pickle Company's relish are a treat and worth every cent.

Mustard
Another classic topping of a Chicago Dog is yellow mustard. When we think of Hot Dogs, we instantly picture yellow Mustard slathered on the Dog.

According to the National Hot Dog and Sausage Council, Mustard is the Hot Dog condiment of choice. Any classic yellow Mustard is acceptable. Do not use Dijon Mustard on your Chicago Dogs! We recommend either Plochman's or French's.

The Pickle
There is nothing like the perfect pickle to compliment your Dog. As far as we are concerned, the pickle you place on your Hot Dog can make or break the experience. A classic Chicago Dog will either have a pickle slice or spear. The pickle you choose should compliment, but not overpower any of the other toppings. A common mistake is to place a sour and/or spicy pickle on your Hot Dog. The pickle should have a nice crunch and the seasoning should be mild. Sometimes cucumber slices are substituted for the pickle.

We highly recommend Crunchy Deli Pickle Spears from the Puckered Pickle Co. These great tasting crunchy pickles are perfect for your Chicago Dog! Click Here to check availability in your area. Another good choice is the Claussen Kosher Dill. These pickles are available in both slices and halves. If you buy the halves, make a spear by slicing down the middle of the pickle (or slice into thirds). Claussen pickles are located in the refrigerated deli meat section of any grocery store.

Onion
Nothing special here. Purchase your standard white onion and chop it. If you don't like the bite of your typical onion, try a vidalia. Vidalia onions have a smooth sweet flavor.

Tomato
For true authenticity, buy a red ripe tomato and cut it into wedges. We prefer a nice quality Beefsteak tomato. Do not chop your tomato or even think about cutting your tomato into slices!

Sport Peppers
An essential topping for any Chicago Dog is the Sport pepper. These peppers are green, about 1-1/2 inches long and usually have a medium-hot taste. When Sport peppers adorn your Dog, they should be whole and never sliced. Don't make the mistake of using peppers that are too hot. Remember, a Chicago Dog is blending of all the toppings. No single ingredient should overpower the others. Our search for Sport peppers has been a little frustrating, but we found them (in Madison) in the ethnic food section at the Copp's on Junction Rd, at Woodman's and Gino's Italian Deli.

Celery Salt
This blend of ground celery seed and fine-grained salt is often described as the defining ingredient of a Chicago Dog. Celery salt is usually available at any grocery store.

Poppyseed Bun
Genuine Chicago Style Hot Dogs are traditionally served on a steamed poppyseed bun. Unfortunately, we have been unable to find a good source for pre-packaged poppyseed buns in Madison. However, you can usually special order poppyseed Hot Dog buns at grocery stores that have their own bakery. Your local Pick'n Save is one example. We are still searching for packaged buns and will let you know when we find them. In the Chicago area, poppyseed buns are available at most grocery stores including Jewel. If you can find "Mary Ann" buns, you are in for a real treat. Turano Bakery also has great buns

Monday, April 14, 2008

Gene and Judes..Hate to Repeat, But "THE BEST"


The greatest hot dog stand in the world serves neither hamburgers, nor polish sausage, nor grilled chicken sandwiches. There is no grill, no char-broiler, no spinning mound of gyros. At the greatest hot dog stand they only need buckets of simmering water for dogs, steamers for steaming buns and Supreme tamales and ever bubbling vats of oil for the fresh cut fries.

You can see the greatest hot dog from far up the street. Beecause the greatest hot dog stand is all glass and harsh flouresant lights and stands as a beacon for all who are hungry. If you see a line, you know it will move fast.

The greatest hot dog stand follows few of the rules laid out by the experts. Their buns are poppy-seedless. They offer few condiments beyond mustard (no ketchup on site). They do not dust their dog with celary salt. Yes, it is a Vienna sausage, but a skinnyish one at that. You really need to eat more than one at the greatest hot dog stand in the world, and many of the customers do (Sample customer, "I'll take seven hot dogs and an [extra] order of fries).

The cooks at the greatest hot dog stand in the world occupy their time in between orders by thrusting fresh idaho potatos through a machine that converts them into perfect sized french fries. These amazing sticks of pure pototo get tossed on top of each offering so that if you want to eat them inside your hot dog bun, well you can and maybe should.

The greatest hot dog stand in the world is a throwback to a world when people ate hot dogs. A throwback to a time when a great stand could keep their buns steamed just right, and their red hots, hot but not limp. So a Gene and Jude hot dog snaps right back at you. Interactive eating. With a side of hot fries, you will know you are at the greatest hot dog stand in the world.

Gene and Judes
2720 River Road
River Grove, IL 60171-1325
708-452-7634

On the corner of River Road and Grand

Monday, April 7, 2008

Parky's Hot Dogs, Forest Park, IL.


Parky's Hot Dogs
329 Harlem Ave
Forest Park, IL 60130-1607
Phone: (708) 366-3090

Cross Street: Washington Boulevard Directions: El: Green Line to Harlem/Lake; bus: 357 to Washington
Specialties: French Fries, Hot Dog
Hours: Mon-Sat 10am-9pm, Sun 11am-7pm

In Short
This compact orange-and-white A-frame has just a couple of stools at the window for seating, plus outdoor picnic tables during warm weather. Folks don't mind waiting for David Berg hot dogs--shorter and plumper than Vienna Beef, and steamed, not grilled. The basic dog gets mustard, chopped onion, pickle relish, tomato and peppers. Also available are chili cheese dogs, Polish sausages, grilled burgers, chicken sandwiches and Italian beef; all served with long, thin fries.

Monday, March 31, 2008

Superdawg



In May of 1948, Superdawg® was established at the corner of Milwaukee, Devon and Nagle in Chicago. Superdawg® continues to be family owned and operated in the same location today.

Maurie Berman, a recently returned G.I. from World War II, married his high school sweetheart Florence (Flaurie), in August of 1947. Maurie was attending Northwestern University, studying to be a CPA, while recent Northwestern grad Flaurie was teaching in the Chicago Public Schools. With their "school-year" schedules, the newlyweds wanted to open a business that they could operate during the summer months. Many other returning G.I.'s were opening roadside hot dog carts and Maurie and Flaurie decided to open their own roadside hot dog stand, one that would be as unique and distinctive as they were.

Maurie designed an architecturally distinct, 20' x 12' building topped with two 12 foot hot dog icons to beckon hungry passersby with their winking and blinking eyes. Maurie and Flaurie then created a proprietary, secret recipe to set themselves apart from the other hot dog stands popping up around the city. With a distinctive look and delicious recipe, they were almost ready to open. All they needed was a name. Inspired by the superheroes featured in the newly-created, popular comics of the '40's, Maurie and Flaurie named their signature product and restaurant. It was not a wiener – not a frankfurter – not a red hot – but their own exclusive SUPERDAWG™.

In 1948, Milwaukee and Devon was the end of the streetcar line. With the forest preserve and Whealan Pool across the street, the area was a great destination for swimming families and cruisin' teens. Kids could ride the streetcar for a nickel, and stop at Superdawg® where a Superdawg™ sandwich and drink cost only 32 cents. Many times, on their way home, they would stop and ask what they could buy for a dime. If they were a few cents short, Maurie and Flaurie would give them what they wanted and told them to bring the money back the next time they stopped, which they never failed to do.

In 1950 Maurie passed the CPA exam, but he and Flaurie decided to keep operating Superdawg® and to open year-round in order to retain the outstanding personnel that had become so invaluable to fulfilling the Superdawg® ideals. When Superdawg® first opened, the electronic speaker system had not been invented. Carhops went out to the cars to take orders and customers signaled that they were ready for their trays to be picked up by turning on their headlights. In the early 1950's the "carhop in a wire" electronic speaker system was installed, and Maurie designed the glowing blue "control tower" where the carhop sits to answer the switchboard and take orders. As Superdawg® grew into a successful business, Maurie and Flaurie found time to raise their family of three children (although not on Whoopercheesies® alone).

Throughout the years, small changes have been made to the menu, like the addition of the Whoopskidawg® in 1989 and the Superchic™ in 1991. However, the Superdawg™ recipe, the original trademark figures (continuing to flirtatiously wink at each other), and the drive-in concept have not changed. Customers can still order from their car and have a carhop deliver their order on a tray. Maurie and Flaurie’s attention to quality products and service, preparing each customer's meal to order, affirming the belief that the customer is always right, and insisting that the customer should always be treated as family continues today.

In 1999, Superdawg® underwent a makeover while retaining the original building and spirit. The classic '40's drive-in was updated with the addition of neon-studded canopies across the parking lot, a crisp new speaker system and a cozy, indoor dining room. The original rooftop figures were refurbished so that they can continue to serve as a Chicago landmark for years to come. In 2003, Superdawg® opened a second location on Midway Airport's B concourse, servicing Southwest Airlines.

Since 1948, Maurie, Flaurie, their children and grandchildren have scrupulously adhered to one goal: "always to serve you in a manner that will make you want to return – and bring your friends, and new generations, with you".

From the bottom of our pure beef hearts... THANKS FOR STOPPING

Tuesday, March 25, 2008

Wiener Circle


2622 N Clark St
Chicago, IL 60614
Phone: 773-477-7444


They're sassy and they're Very-spirited, but because Wiener's Circle staffers serve some of the best franks and fries in town, people usually forgive them. The chili fries are an especially decadent treat. This Lincoln Park landmark is just a simple little hot dog stand, but at 3AM it's a godsend for local bar hoppers. On warm nights, diners can linger outdoors where a smattering of picnic tables are available.

Monday, March 17, 2008

So What Exactly is a Chicago Style Hot Dog?



So What Exactly is a Chicago Style Hot Dog?

Before we explain what a Chicago Dog is and what makes it so special, let's take quick look at what a Hot Dog is. If you look up the definition of "Hot Dog", you will generally see the following:

hot dog or hot·dog (hot'dôg', -dog')
noun.

A frankfurter, especially one served hot in a long soft roll. Also called red-hot.
A type of cooked meat in the shape of a sausage; it is usually served in a long bun.
One who performs showy, often dangerous stunts, in order to attract attention

A Dog With a Difference
A Chicago Style Hot Dog is more than just a Hot Dog; it's a taste sensation with the perfect blend of toppings. So, what exactly is a Chicago Dog? A Chicago Style Hot Dog is a steamed all beef Hot Dog topped with yellow mustard, bright green relish, onions, tomato wedges, pickle spear or slice, sport peppers and a dash of celery salt served in the all-important steamed poppyseed bun.

The toppings are just as important as the order they are applied to the Hot Dog. Add toppings in the following order:


Yellow Mustard
Bright Green Relish
Fresh Chopped Onions
Two Tomato Wedges
A Pickle Spear or Slice
Two Sport Peppers
A Dash of Celery Salt
Remember: When adding toppings, dress the dog and not the bun!


Why is the placement of the toppings so important? If your Chicago Dog has been made properly, you will get a taste of each ingredient in every bite.


A Chicago Style Hot Dog is never boiled, but slowly simmered using steam heat until the hot dog reaches approximately 170-180 degrees. Although steam is the preferred method to heat the Hot Dog, grilling, heating in water or using the microwave are also acceptable. Since Hot Dogs are pre-cooked all you need to do is heat the dog.

Fluky's (a Chicago institution since 1929) provides these instructions for heating your Hot Dogs: Bring the water to a boil, turn the water down until it stops boiling, or a slight simmer. (DO NOT COOK HOT DOGS IN BOILING WATER). Place desired number of hot dogs into water and cook uncovered for 20 minutes.

Vienna® Beef Hot Dogs are probably the best tasting dogs you will ever experience. Over 80% of hot dog street vendors in Chicago proudly serve Vienna® Beef Hot Dogs.

Where's the Ketchup?
As mentioned earlier, the toppings are just as important as the Hot Dog itself. If you look at the required toppings for a Chicago Dog, you will notice that Ketchup is not listed among them. Ketchup is an ingredient frowned upon by Hot Dog aficionados. Although ketchup remains one of the most popular condiments on Hot Dogs, "properly made" Hot Dogs, like the Chicago Style, usually lack the condiment.

Those who consider themselves Hot Dog connoisseurs are often vehemently opposed to eating (or even witnessing) Hot Dogs with ketchup; they think the flavor of ketchup overpowers and destroys the taste of the Hot Dog instead of complementing it. Nowhere is this difference in opinion more apparent than in Chicago.

The inclusion of ketchup on a Chicago Style Hot Dog is a controversial issue. Most adult Chicagoans will shun ketchup. Chicago Hot Dog stands will not, as a rule, put ketchup on a Chicago Dog. Some stands will provide ketchup although you are responsible for defacing your Dog.

"You know what makes me really sick to my stomach? It's watching you stuff your face with those Hot Dogs! Nobody - I mean nobody puts ketchup on a Hot Dog!". - This is a famous line from the movie Sudden Impact starring Clint Eastwood.

The National Hot Dog & Sausage Council, in its recommendations for proper Hot Dog Etiquette capitulate only slightly to the public's general regard for ketchup, saying "Don't use ketchup on your hot dog after the age of 18.".

Learn the Lingo
"The Works" - When ordering a Chicago Style Hot Dog it is important to understand the terminology. Probably the most important word is "works". For example, the proper way to order your Dog is to say, "I'll take a Chicago Dog with the works". First of all, it is important to say "Chicago Dog" when placing your order. This sends a clear message that you want an all beef Hot Dog served on a steamed poppyseed bun. When you say " with the works" you are saying that you want "everything" (yellow mustard, bright green relish, onions, tomato wedges, pickle spear, sport peppers and a dash of celery salt) on your Dog.
Tip: When it is your turn to order you better have an idea of what you want. Hot Dog establishments are usually very crowded and very fast paced. The person behind the counter expects you to know what you want. If you are not ready, let the person behind you place their order first.

"Snap" - When biting into an all beef Hot Dog, there should be slight resistance from the casing. The resistance is referred to as the "snap". For example, "it has the nice 'snap'.". Next time you have a Chicago Dog, impress your friends and family by taking a bite and commenting on the "snap".

"Dragged Through the Garden" - Chicago Dogs are sometimes described this way because of all the vegetables.

Ambiance
Don't be too concerned about the appearance of the place you get your Dog from. For me the ambiance is important and contributes to the overall Chicago Dog experience. Some of the best Hot Dog joints are probably considered "dives" by most people's standards. Don't expect a typical sit-down restaurant with a well-appointed interior and full menu. Many don't even have any place to sit while other places are not much more than an order counter and some stools to sit on (the round ones are my favorite). Typically, there is always a deal that includes fries and a drink. Fries complete the package.

We should mention that you should also try a Chicago Style Italian Beef Sandwich. If they have great Dogs, they should have great Italian Beefs.

Give Us a Sign!
One thing for sure in the Hot Dog business is brand loyalty. Places that serve Chicago Style Hot Dogs are proud of the brand they sell and that should be apparent (in most cases) even before you walk through the door. If there are no signs on the outside indicating the Hot Dog brand served, there had better be some indication on the inside. Be skeptical of any place that claims to serve a Chicago Dog and gives no indication of their brand affiliation.

The Cart Experience
Nothing compares to getting your dog from a Hot Dog cart. There is something special about the Hot Dog stand that creates an indescribable feeling of intrigue. Even people who don't usually eat Hot Dogs can't resist the urge to eat one when they see a Hot Dog cart. I think that Louie DiRaimondo, president of All American Hot Dog Carts in Miami, said it best when talking about the carts they sell: "We create an experience, not just a product". That is so true!

Relish Your Dog
Next to the Dog itself, the most important ingredient of a Chicago Style Dog is the Relish. It is certainly the topping that either makes or breaks your Dog. Classic Chicago Dogs are famous for their bright green relish. Although standard relish can be used, nothing compares to the taste and look of the neon colored green relish. The neon green relish was introduced in the early 1970s by Fluky’s, an original west side Hot Dog vendor

Wanna read more check them out
www.hotdogchicagostyle.com